Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Estate – 5 Little Known Secrets of the Acclaimed Home

The Biltmore Estate is one of the most luxurious homes in the history of America. Located in Asheville, North Carolina, this historic home was once owned by one of America’s wealthiest families. The Vanderbilts were one of the most influential families in the United States, but did you know there are some things about Biltmore?

The Biltmore Estate is one of the most luxurious homes in the history of America. Located in Asheville, North Carolina, this historic home was once owned by one of America’s wealthiest families. The Vanderbilts were one of the most influential families in the United States, but did you know there are some things about Biltmore?

The Biltmore Estate Is The Largest Privately Owned Home In The United States.

The Biltmore Estate is the largest privately-owned home in the United States. It was built by George Vanderbilt, a scion of the wealthy Vanderbilt family, who bought up most of Asheville and surrounding areas starting in 1889. When he died in 1914 at age 82, he left behind one of the largest private homes on Earth: 125 rooms spread across 250 acres (it would be more significant if you added in all 8,000 acres of the surrounding land). Today it’s open to visitors year-round and draws more than 1 million visitors each year.

The Vanderbilts Were One Of America’s Most Wealthy And Influential Families.

The Vanderbilts were one of America’s most wealthy families, and the Biltmore Estate was an ideal place for them to build. Before the estate was built, the Vanderbilt family owned no land in North Carolina. However, by 1895, they had purchased more than 70 properties in Asheville alone. Their wealth was also known for their philanthropy; William Vanderbilt donated millions to Vanderbilt University and organizations throughout his life.

George Vanderbilt Completed His Dream Home In 1895 But Only Lived To Enjoy It For Nine Years.

George Vanderbilt completed his dream home in 1895 but only lived for nine years. He died of pneumonia at 64 on January 18, 1914. However, he left behind a $100 million estate. This extraordinary sum allowed him and others who were left in charge of running the estate.

The Biltmore Estate remains an active part of Asheville’s tourism industry today, welcoming visitors from all over the world who come to see one of America’s most beautiful homes.

Official Tours Of The Biltmore Are Given By Tour Guides Who Are Very Knowledgeable About The Estate.

Tours of the Biltmore start at $89 and can include knowledgeable tour guides who will guide you through little-known secret areas of the Biltmore Estate. However, they are only offered in the summer months and only in English. Reservations for these tours must be made at least 24 hours in advance.

Tours last approximately two hours and include stops at several places on the grounds: you’ll visit Antler Hill Village; stroll through a formal garden and an English garden with over 1,000 varieties of plants; wander through miles of gardens filled with azaleas, rhododendrons, and lilacs.

Bring your camera and take photos next to a waterfall; walk through one of North Carolina’s first golf courses; explore a conservatory filled with exotic plants (including some which were once thought extinct); learn more about George Vanderbilt’s life story at his childhood home called “The Oaks”; see where George Vanderbilt lived when he was building his castle (he couldn’t live there while it was being built); take photos inside Biltmore House (which has been featured as an escape from reality on MTV’s Cribs).

Tourists Can Still Attend Events And Concerts At The Estate Today.

  • The estate is open to the public. If you’re not staying at the resort, tours of the grounds are available year-round for a fee. Tours are conducted by authorized guides who give detailed information about each room’s history and architectural style (and its antiques).
  • You can attend concerts at Biltmore Estate: Several events take place every season, including a seasonal summer concert series featuring world-class performers like Al Di Meola and Pink Martini.

This Beautiful Place Is Worth Visiting If You’re In North Carolina.

The Biltmore Estate is a beautiful place to visit, and it’s worth your time if you’re in North Carolina. The grounds alone are enough to make you want to stay for a while—with their waterfalls, sunken gardens, and lush greenery, there’s always something new around every corner. You can also see many of the rooms in the house (or at least part of them), which makes it truly immersive.

The Biltmore Estate is open year-round, but they don’t take reservations during January or February because this is when they’re closed for renovations. They recommend booking well in advance if possible!

Conclusion

The Biltmore Estate is a beautiful place to visit, and there is so much more to do than just tour the house. You can spend your day hiking through the trails or enjoying a picnic at the many spots around the estate. There are also plenty of activities for kids and adults alike. If you’re planning on visiting this fantastic property, you must make sure you have enough time set aside so that you don’t miss out on anything!

Takeaways

The Biltmore Estate is a beautiful place to visit, and there is so much more to do than just tour the house. You can spend your day hiking through the trails or enjoying a picnic at the many spots around Asheville North Carolina. The Biltmore is a fine example of estate homes in the deep south that contrasts with the antebellum plantation estates that are left. 

There are also plenty of activities for kids and adults alike. If you’re planning on visiting this fantastic property, you must make sure you have enough time set aside so that you don’t miss out on anything!

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Paul Austin

Paul is a writer living in the Great Lakes Region. He dabbles in research of historical events, places, and people on his website at Michigan4You. When he isn't under a deadline, you can find him on the beach with a good book and a cold beer.

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